Postnatal Exercise: When Can I Start?

 

Restarting exercise after giving birth can be a point of concern for new mums. A number of questions arise and, inevitably, the answers differ somewhat from person to person, dependent upon a range of factors.

Pelvic floor/Kegel exercises are very low-risk, and can therefore begin very soon after delivery, from the comfort of your own bed. I aim to educate my clients on these exercises during the prenatal period, so there’s no uncertainty  the immediate afterbirth stage.

In terms of regular exercise, with a natural birth, it’s essential to wait for your 6-8 week postnatal appointment. Any qualified practitioner should examine your stomach to determine the extent of abdominal separation (diastasis recti). This, alongside a number of other health-related questions, will determine how soon you’re able to get back to training.

Note: I’ve come across a number of GPs in Dubai that don’t deem it necessary to perform these checks (something that I disagree with entirely). As such, always ensure you are dealing with a qualified professional.

I’m not, in any way, trying to suggest my knowledge on the subject is greater than that of any GP. I am, however, confirming that any Dubai-based readers must take heed when selecting their practitioner. I’ve come across some questionably nonchalant attitudes towards the whole affair. If in doubt, seek a second opinion.

With a C-section, timings are slightly more delayed. You’ll need to wait for a 10-12 week check up, where the GP will examine how the scar has healed. All being well, you’ll be back to exercise no later than the 12-14 week bracket. This is, again, dependent upon individual circumstances.

For individual guidance/enquiries, email charlotteshelley1@gmail.com.

Pre and Post Natal Series: The Posture Edit

Aaaand, we’re back with the second installment of my pregnancy series. In today’s post, we’re going to be focusing on the postural benefits of exercising whilst pregnant.

Throughout pregnancy, the body’s centre of gravity is shifted forwards, due to the increased weight of the baby. This adjustment increases the load on the mother’s lumbar spine. The below picture demonstrates the impact this places on the musculature of the body.

Screen Shot 2018-02-21 at 17.57.24

For this reason, it’s crucially important for the mother to have a strong lower back before, during and after pregnancy. One focal point of pre/post natal programming is to maintain strength through the posterior chain (muscles on the back side of the body – think gluteals, hamstrings, erectors, etc) . This, in turn, helps to avoid lordosis (excessive forward tilt of the pelvis), which can cause severe lower back pain.

After pregnancy, the aim is to further develop posterior strength, in order to aid the restoration of normal, pre-pregnancy posture. As the muscles of the lower back become stronger, they shorten in length, providing much needed support and stabilisation to the lumbar spine.

For enquiries on Pre and Post Natal Training, contact +971 52 742 1966.

Pre and Post Natal Series: Should I Exercise Whilst Pregnant?

This post marks the first of a mini series, on the topic of pregnancy and wellness, to tie in with the launch of ‘Bumps and Barbells’; a new, concept class, run at Beyond Human Training and Nutrition in Al Quoz. As a Personal Trainer, I specialise in Pre and Post Natal Exercise, hence, the class targets both new and expectant mummas.

The most common concern when falling pregnant is ‘what exercise is safe for me and the baby?’ In truth, there’s not a ‘one size fits all’ programme. I mean, I could certainly create one, but it would have to err very much on the side of caution if it was to align with every mumma-to-be out there.

Any individualised pre-natal programme will depend largely on exercise history, and the respective pregnancy itself. Your fitness journey will be guided by (but not limited to) what your body is used to. There are a number of very generalised rules, which as a pre and postnatal trainer, we’re advised to apply to everyone. However, in my experience, every individual copes with pregnancy very differently. Below, I’ve outlined some key (and very broad/universal) points to do with exercising whilst pregnant.

1) Relaxin:

One rule that cannot be overlooked is that to do with relaxin. This hormone is produced during pregnancy in order to lubricate joints and prepare the body for childbirth. Although relaxin is required primarily to make the hips more pliable during the birthing process itself, its release is not localised to this area. Instead, the hormone is spread through the body as a whole, compromising stability in all joints.

For this reason, it’s important to avoid high impact activity, both during and immediately after pregnancy. No squat jumps for the time being, ladies… Although I’m sure this is music to your ears!

The presence of relaxin also emphasises the importance of resistance training, to maintain strong, stable joints, thereby reducing the risk of associated injuries.

2) Frequency/Intensity:

Gym bunnies – there’s no need to stress! It’s likely that if you trained 3-4 days a week pre-pregnancy, you’ll be able to continue. The intensity may need to be reduced to suit your energy levels, but don’t scrap the usual routine entirely.

I think it goes without saying that we won’t be working towards a one rep max squat/bench/deadlift either during or immediately after pregnancy. As cliché as it may sound, it’s a case of ‘listening to your body’. If you’re training too hard, it’s more than likely that your body will let you know.

On the flip side, if you didn’t train at all pre-pregnancy, consider this a very good time to start! At Bumps and Barbells, we aim to get our mummies moving for three sessions per week, each lasting 45-60 minutes. The classes are structured in a way that facilitates variations in intensity, so everyone can work within their own comfort zone.

I hope you’ve enjoyed the first post of my pregnancy mini-series. There’s plenty more content to come, so please do send me a message if there’s anything you’re interested in reading!

For more information on Bumps and Barbells, or one-to-one Personal Training in Dubai, call me on: +971 52 742 1966.